AMAZING VIEW!!! Hundreds of Wild Boars Crossing the Road

  • Added:  1 month ago
  • Fascinating scene of a large group of wild boars crossing the road.

    The wild boar, also known as the wild swine or Eurasian wild pig is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its range further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene, and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World. As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognised, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length. The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young. Fully grown males are usually solitary outside the breeding season. The grey wolf is the wild boar's main predator throughout most of its range except in the Far East and the Lesser Sunda Islands, where it is replaced by the tiger and Komodo dragon respectively. It has a long history of association with humans, having been the ancestor of most domestic pig breeds and a big-game animal for millennia. Actual attacks on humans are rare, but can be serious, resulting in multiple penetrating injuries to the lower part of the body. They generally occur during the boars' rutting season from November–January, in agricultural areas bordering forests or on paths leading through forests. The animal typically attacks by charging and pointing its tusks towards the intended victim, with most injuries occurring on the thigh region. Once the initial attack is over, the boar steps back, takes position and attacks again if the victim is still moving, only ending once the victim is completely incapacitated. A 2012 study compiling recorded attacks from 1825-2012 found accounts of 665 human victims of both wild boars and feral pigs, with the majority of attacks in the animal's native range occurring in India. Most of the attacks occurred in rural areas during the winter months in non-hunting contexts, and were committed by solitary males. Boars can be damaging to agriculture. Populations living on the outskirts of towns or farms can dig up potatoes and damage melons, watermelons and maize. They generally only encroach upon farms when natural food is scarce. While the role of boars in damaging crops is often exaggerated, cases are known of boar depredations causing famines, as was the case in Hachinohe, Japan in 1749, where 3,000 people died of what became known as the 'wild boar famine'. Still within Japanese culture, the boar's status as vermin is expressed through its title as "king of pests" and the popular saying "When you get married, choose a place with no wild boar."In Central Europe, farmers typically repel boars through distraction or fright, while in Kazakhstan it is usual to employ guard dogs in plantations. Although large boar populations can play an important role in limiting forest growth, they are also useful in keeping pest populations such as June bugs under control. The growth of urban areas and corresponding decline in natural boar habitats has led to some sounders entering human habitations in search of food.

    All information according to www.wikipedia.org

    Please submit your original video to StonehengeSubmit@gmail.com*
    * - We can only accept and publish material if you are the original owner of the video submitted.

    If you see a clip that you own and you did not submit it or give consent for use, we have likely received false permission and would be happy to resolve this for you!
    Please drop us a line at StonehengeLicensing@gmail.com
  • Video CategoriesPets & Animals
  • Runtime: 1:33
  • Tags for this video:  animal  animals  nature  road  wild  boar  boars  running  country  

Comments: 2

  • Susan B
    Susan B 1 month ago

    Do you know the location of the wild boars in the video? I have heard that there are boars living in the southern regions of the U.S.A. But have never witnessed their presence myself. Thank you for taking the time to add the written information, I read it and find the subject very interesting.Have a great day!

  • TheFightingSheep
    TheFightingSheep 1 month ago

    This is where you set up your turret next time

Analyse website